golden milk popsicles

Golden Milk Popsicles with Ginger

These delicious layered golden milk popsicles have two different liquids in the base that are frozen separately in layers. The yellow layer is golden milk made with ginger and other spices, and the other is homemade pistachio milk.

golden milk popsicles coverIf you haven’t heard of golden milk yet, it’s a popular anti-inflammatory drink featuring turmeric. It has become so popular that many coffee shops are now offering golden milk lattes – steamed milk with turmeric and other spices instead of coffee. 

Of course, you can just make the whole popsicles from the golden milk recipe.

The Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Health Benefits of the  Ingredients

Turmeric

Turmeric contains curcumin, known to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

Curcumin is fat soluble, so you’ll want to take it with some kind of oil or fat. Coconut milk is an ideal vehicle, as well as a good base ingredient for vegan popsicles. To get the most benefit from the turmeric, it’s also good to add a little black pepper. 

Curcumin in turmeric is poorly absorbed into the bloodstream, so eating turmeric on its own is unlikely to give you the anti-inflammatory benefits, however, adding black pepper can help. Research supports that combining the piperine in black pepper with the curcumin in turmeric enhances curcumin absorption by up to 2,000% 

Cardamom

Cardamom can also help fight chronic inflammation from its high antioxidant content. Antioxidants protect cells from damage and stop inflammation from occurring.

Pistachios

Pistachios are high in healthy fats, fibre, protein, antioxidants and other nutrients, including vitamin B6 and potassium, and may contribute to a healthier gut, and improved metabolism.

 

Golden Milk Popsicle Ingredients

Golden Milk Base

1 can coconut milk
½ + ⅛ tsp cardamom powder
2“ ginger, finely chopped
1 ½ tsp turmeric
3 tbsp maple syrup
Pinch black pepper

 

Pistachio Base

1 c pistachios
1 c water
maple syrup to taste

 

Chocolate Magic Shell

2 tbsp coconut oil
2 tbsp cocoa powder
1 ½ tsp maple syrup
Pinch of salt

Optional Garnish 

shredded coconut
cinnamon

Golden Milk Popsicle Base

Finely chop the ginger. Pour the coconut milk in a small pot and add the ginger, cardamom, turmeric, and pepper. Bring to a boil, turn heat to low and simmer 5 minutes. Stir in the maple syrup.

 

Strain the liquid. Cool and set aside while you make the pistachio layer.

Pistachio Layer

Blend 1 cup of pistachios and 1 cup of water in a high-powered blender. Using cheesecloth or a jelly bag, strain the liquid. Sweeten with maple syrup to taste.

Fill molds ⅓ with golden milk, freeze. Add pistachio milk to ⅔ full, freeze. Top up with golden milk. Freeze.

Dark Chocolate Dip or Drizzle

Place parchment paper on a cold plate and set aside. Working quickly, remove the pops from the mold one at a time. Hold over a clean bowl while you spoon or pour the chocolate dip over the pops. Rotate the pops so the chocolate coats evenly and drips down into the bowl. The dip will harden very quickly.

Place the finished pop on the parchment and return to the freezer immediately. Repeat with remaining pops, and put them back in the freezer as you finish dipping them.

Another option instead of dipping is to lay all the pops on parchment and drizzle the chocolate in lines across them. 

Optionally garnish with grated coconut or cinnamon.

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Make Your Own Herbal First Aid Kit

I took Holistic Herbal Wellness with Savayda in 2014, and one of the most useful things we learned was how to assemble a herbal first aid kit. Because we learned how to make tinctures and infused oils in the course, I knew how to make some of these items myself after the class, and there are also some items on the list that are worth buying. They’re easy to find at most natural health stores. 

Minor injuries like cuts, bites, burns, bruises and sore muscles can happen to anyone at any time, so it’s a good idea to start assembling these items to cover all the bases. 

Start collecting these herbal remedies now so you’ll be prepared for any minor injuries or discomforts.

Rescue Remedy

A commercially available blend of Bach Flower Essences, available in dropper, spray, or lozenges. For shock, emotional and physical, and stressful situations like dentist visits. Take 4 drops immediately, followed by regular dosing until the situation has stabilized. It can be rubbed onto a person who is injured or in shock and can’t take medicines orally, and can be used topically on pets and with house plants. 

 

Arnica cream Arnica montana

An arnica cream or gel is good to have on hand for bruises, sprains, recovery from operations, dental work etc. It can also be used after mental strain and heart strain.  Can help with back pain. Take 2 tablets every two hours for shock or injury, and even after surgery.

 

You can find Arnica products that are either homeopathic or that contain extracts. I like the Weleda Arnica cream because it has a high percentage of wild-crafted Arnica, but many people also get great results with a homeopathic cream. Traumeel is a popular homeopathic brand. 

 

Tea tree oil Melaleuca alternifolia

Antiseptic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal. Use on cuts or sores, directly or diluted in a carrier oil.  Also use as a mouth rinse or gargle, douche, sitz bath. Wipe for preventing and soothing bug bites.

 

Ginger capsules or tincture Zingiber officinale

Use for nausea or motion sickness, stomach flu and morning sickness. 1-2 caps or 20 drops tincture before traveling. Valuable for cramps of any kind and indigestion. Combine with other remedies for fever, colds and flu.

 

The tincture is easy to make with the folk method. Fill a jar ¼ full of fresh ginger, fill the jar with vodka or brandy. Steep for 2 weeks. Strain out the ginger pieces. Put your tincture in a dropper bottle and keep some in the car in case of motion sickness. 

 

Echinacea tincture Echinacea angustifolia, E. purpurea

Use at first sign of cold or infection by taking 30 drops, undiluted, on the back of the throat, every hour, until symptoms subside, up to ten times a day.

Can be used topically for inflammation of the skin, skin infections, bites, stings, cuts, and infections.  Dilute 60 drops tincture in ¼ cup of water and use as a wash or compress.

 

Ear oil Verbascum, Hypericum perforatum, Allium sativum

Infused oil of mullein, St.John’s wort, and garlic.  Infuse the oils separately so you can use them for other purposes, and then combine as needed for earache. For earache warm the oil in a double boiler and use 3-5 drops in each ear.  Lie on one side and rub the area outside of the ear. It may be helpful to apply heat outside the ear.

 

Shepherd’s Purse tincture  Capsella bursa-pastoris

For minor bleeding, that is non-life threatening such as nose bleeds, minor cuts, bleeding gums. Apply the infusion as a compress.  ½ cup of the tea, or 60 drops of tincture can be taken, up to 6 times daily. 

 

Topically: To use as a wash, dilute 30 drops of tincture in ½ cup water

Internally: Take 30 drops every hour until bleeding stops. A cup of the tea is also helpful.

Honey

For burns cover area immediately and leave on until pain subsides (approx. 30 minutes)

 

Fresh Plantain   Plantago major

It’s hard to keep this one in a herbal first aid kit because it is really best used fresh as a poultice. So instead of your herbal first aid kit, keep it in your herbal first aid garden or just leave it growing in your lawn so you’ll always have some on hand. Use it on bug bites, bee stings, burns and cuts and scrapes. To make a poultice, chew a few fresh leaves into a pulp, place this moist leaf pulp directly on the injured/bitten area and wrap in gauze. Keep on the skin for a few hours, re-applying as needed. 

 

Lavender Essential Oil  Lavandula angustifolia

A versatile addition to any herbal first aid kit, lavender essential oil can be used topically to help many ailments, including burns, cuts, bruises, sunburns, itchy skin, and cold sores. It also does double-duty because of its aromatherapeutic effects. Lavender is renowned for its ability to relieve stress and anxiety, and promote relaxation. Since you may be a little stressed or irritated if you have an issue that requires a first aid kit, it’s nice to include lavender to soothe your mind. 

 

If you’d like to learn how to forage wild medicinals, infuse oils, and make tinctures, you’ll love Savayda’s 1-year Holistic Herbal Wellness course. 

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Herbs to Keep You Warm in Winter

Herbs of Fire

Naturally, when it is cold we effort to keep warm.  Some tolerate the cold better than others, just like some thrive in the summer heat while others wilt – it depends on ones constitution.

As a Nova Scotia resident you likely have well established rituals and habits for keeping warm during our cold winter season, like staying indoors more, cooked foods, wool, whisky, and fires.  My best winter survival techniques are soups, teas, and baths, and they all involve herbs.

If you want to warm up quickly, eat some horseradish.  It is traditionally eaten with meat and fatty foods to improve their digestion.  It also goes well with eggs, beans, fish, and sushi.  Horseradish has been used as a medicine for centuries.  It is a powerful circulatory stimulant.  It can be used internally and topically for arthritis, gout, and inflammation.  It is one the most effective remedies for clearing lung and sinus congestion.  Eat ½ tsp. 2-3 times daily to clear up a persistent congestive cold.

Ginger is always in my winter teapot, either fresh or dried.  In addition to being a good cold and flu remedy, it is a digestive stimulant, anti-inflammatory and a remedy for nausea.  It makes a great poultice for congestive colds.  To 2 cups boiled water add 1 tsp. ginger powder. Soak a cloth in the liquid, wring it out then drape it across the chest, covering up with blankets to keep warm.  Repeat several times on the front and back.  Try it in a foot bath – in a basin full of hot water add 1 tsp. ginger powder, soak for 15-20 minutes to take the chill off.

When I need to thaw out after being out in the cold, nothing feels better than a hot soak. With the addition of herbs, an ordinary bath can become fragrant and therapeutic.  Herbs have been used as part of bathing rituals for centuries. In addition to immersion, water was sprinkled, splashed, poured and sweated to heighten the spiritually cleansing aspect of bathing.

“A daily spiritual bath is an easy way to start paying attention to your spirit and soul as well as your body.” ~ Tieraona Low Dog, M.D. and Herbalist

A herbal bath can ease the stresses of daily life, bringing a peaceful state of mind. If you don’t have a full tub, a hand or foot bath will work. I recommend herbal baths for people who have anxiety and insomnia.  To prepare a healing bath you simply make a super strong tea and add it to the bath.  In 3 lt boiled water, steep 1 cup of your chosen herb (s), covered, for 20 minutes.  Strain the liquid and add to your bath water.

For relaxation: lavender, hops, hibiscus, lemon balm, rose, and chamomile

For skin irritations such as eczema or rashes:  calendula, lavender, yarrow, and chamomile

For sore joints and muscles:  lavender, chamomile, wintergreen, rosemary

For colds:  peppermint, elderflowers, thyme, pine needles

A hot bowl of soup is comfort food at its best.  Hot soup can help to banish sickness and increase vitality.  Herbs are great when making stock – many are mineral rich and will enhance the nutrition of your soup – nettle, burdock root and dandelion roots and leaves are good choices.  Astragulus root is a powerful immune tonic and I add it to all of my winter soup stocks to prevent colds and flu.  Shiitake mushrooms are equally valuable for strengthening the immune system – they go in the pot too.  For extra fiery potency add ginger or chili powders to intensify the medicinal value of your soup.

Speaking of fire – don’t forget to get a daily dose of sunshine.  Brave the cold and get outside on your lunch break or for an afternoon walk to enjoy the beautiful and shapely trees that line our city streets.  We need as much sun exposure as we can get to chase away the winter blues.

Keep warm!